Scott, Gregory

Gregory Scott, Chicago, IL, USA

Gregory Scott's work explores how we perceive and value art and its different mediums. He is currently combining photography, video, and painting into narratives that contain illusion, commentary on the world of art, and emotional elements from humor to pathos. His work has been published internationally, including features in Lenswork, Art News, Russian Esquire, and Photo District News. He has exhibited throughout the US, as well as in Germany, Russia and the United Arab Emirates, including solo shows at the Rockford and LSU Art Museums. Gregory is represented by Catherine Edelman Gallery in Chicago as well as galleries in London and New Orleans. His work is in the collections of the Columbus Museum of Art, Fundació Privada Sorigué, and the Museum of Contemporary Photography. His home and studio are in Chicago, where the winters are cold and dreary and the summers are bright and magical.

Gregory Scott: Moriah, from the series evanescences, archival inkjet print, 2007, 10,2x10,2cm

Obscurescences

The anonymous photographic portrait is a magnificent illusion. Removed from the time and place when the portrait was taken, the answers to who, where, and when are no longer self-evident. Everything can be seen, but nothing can be known.

"What if"

Gregory Scott: Two feet under, archival inkjet print, 2005, 50,8x34cm, edition 15

"What if" is a good question, I think. What if I was taller? Or fatter? Would that make me different inside too? What if I was five years old? A five-year old doesn’t think before acting, they simply do whatever pops into their head. Like kicking in the lake just to see the water splash. What if my body was female, or a horse, or a bird? What if the room I’m in is an illusion and the picture hanging on the wall is real? As delightful as curious exploration may be, however, there is something else that drives me. I want to capture those emotional states that we all have as humans. Moments of being that elude verbal description. How does humor make sadness more poignant? Or sadness give humor more depth?

How can loneliness be so starkly personal and yet utterly universal?
And why does art always have to be so goddamn serious?

Collections

Columbus Museum of Art, Chicago, IL, USA
Fundació Privada Sorigué, Chicago, IL, USA
Museum of Contemporary Photography, Chicago, IL, USA

links for Gregory Scott

>>> photographers:network selection 2007

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