Publications

2010

  EXIT 37 Arquitectura 2  Roundup, National Aeronautics and Space Administration, May 2010   Antonio Palacios: ¡OH CIELOS!, Círculo de Bellas Artes, Madrid, Spain, 2010   Thomas Kellner: FarbWelt 135-36  Brasilia 50 years of a modern utopia  Photopresse  Thomas Kellner Brasilia  Sheona Beaumont, Bristol through the lens  Bürgerstiftung Siegen, 2010. Kunst zum Helfen

title: FarbWelt 135-36

editor (Herausgeber): Kreis Düren

authors (Autoren): Landrat Wolfgang Spelthahn, Katharina Rolfink, Prof. Dr. Frank Günter Zehnder

artists (Künstler): Thomas Kellner

format: 30×21,5cm | 11,8×8,5inches, 80 pages, hardcover

languages (Sprachen): German, English

publisher (Verlag): seltmann+söhne

ISBN 978-3-942831-68-0

published (year): 2010

edition (Auflage): N.N.

price: 29,80€

Excellent (Awarded) Art

In 2009 the German artist Thomas Kellner received the Fineart award by the county government of Düren. “Farbwelt 135-36” was published in conjunction with the award and its title is a tribute to a famous brand in photography. This illustrated monograph gathers the most important works of his series “Tango Metropolis” and “Dancing Walls”. The images provide an insight into the artist’s work from 1997-2009 where he developed his unique style of deconstruction. Prof. Dr. Günter Zehnder, art historian and former director of the Rheinisches Landesmuseum in Bonn, wrote an introduction worth reading from an art-historical point of view which accompanies this illustrated book. „What belongs here to Thomas Kellner’s unique technique and composition style at the same time reminds us of the picture flood that we are all subjected to around the clock, practically without any breaks. Almost 98% of them are created with a photographic camera along with all of the technology that follows - up to the quick and clumsy cell phone image. We, that is to say every generation is surrounded by a colorful picture world that leads us to perceive many things in passing, ostensibly and superficially, thereby leading us to often see everything and yet nothing. The catchy picture which therefore does not require any analysis and thought is often the most popular.” (abstracted from Prof. Dr. Frank Günter Zehnder)

Thomas Kellner: 67#02 Zeche Zollverein, 2009, C-Print, 26,7 x 34,9 / 10,5" x 13,7", edition 12+3

Ausgezeichnete Fotografie

2009 wurde dem Foto-Künstler Thomas Kellner der Kunstpreis des Kreises Düren verliehen. Anlässlich dieser Auszeichnung entstand „Farbwelt 135-36“, dessen Namensgebung auf die Verpackungsbeschriftung eines bekannten Fotofilm-Herstellers zurückgeht. Was sich in diesem Bildband versammelt sind die Highlights von Kellners bisherigem Schaffen. Dieser Bildband enthält sowohl Fotografien aus der Serie „Tango Metropolis“ als auch „Dancing Walls“. Die Arbeiten vermitteln einen Einblick in das künstlerische Schaffen Kellners von 1997-2009, wo sich sein Stil der „Zerstückelung“ ausprägte. Eine lesenswerte kunstwissenschaftliche Einleitung von Prof. Dr. Günter Zehnder, dem ehemaligen Direktor des rheinischen Landesmuseums in Bonn, begleitet den Bildband. „Was hier zur unverwechselbaren Technik und Kompositionsweise von Thomas Kellner gehört, erinnert doch zugleich auch an die Bilderschwemme, der wir alle rund um die Uhr geradezu pausenlos ausgesetzt sind. Zu fast 98 % hat sie mit der fotografischen Kamera und ihrer gesamten Nachfolgetechnik bis hin zum schnellen und ungelenken Handy-Foto zu tun. Wir, das heißt: alle Generationen sind von einer bunten Bilderwelt umgeben, die dazu führt, vieles nur flüchtig, vordergründig und oberflächlich wahrzunehmen. So sehen wir oft alles und nichts. Das eingängige Bild, das keiner Analyse und Hinterfragung bedarf, ist deshalb oft das liebste. Zu diesem unterschiedslosen Bilderkonsum steht das künstlerische Vorgehen Kellners - trotz seines erheblichen Bildereinsatzes - in einem deutlichen Gegensatz. Jedes Einzelbild ist gesucht und gefunden, spielt eine wichtige Rolle im Gesamt einer Darstellung, es muss betrachtet und will im Kontext verstanden werden.“ (Auszug, Prof. Dr. Frank Günter Zehnder)

book and print, no frame, not mat

Farbwelt has 100 copies special edition with a small Brasilia Cathedral print. 89,90 Euros

Thank you to Kreiss Düren for this Fine Art Award, exhibition and book, thank you to the Jury and to Glasmalereimuseum and special thanks to Prof. Frank-Günter Zehnder for this wonderful essay.

Thomas Kellner: FarbWelt 135-36, 2010

Prof. Dr. Frank Günter Zehnder:

Thomas Kellner’s work and methodology are exceptional. They rightfully claim their unique characteristics in the worldwide photography scene. In connection with the history, the techniques and the requirements of photography and photographic art, they are self-reflexive. They stand in the tradition of the field, yet are innovative in an unusual courageous way. Their roots are original queries to the contents and visual value as well as a rational and emotional, fierce creativity.


Questioning evolved iconographs and usual image expectations offer Kellner new approaches in composition and meaning from object to object, from image solution to image solution. His art deals with reality, employing both the level of interpretation behind it along with abstraction at the same time. Even though they are formally and intellectually very challenging, the images are understandable and thus accessible for everyone.

English honorable essay / Deutsche Laudatio unten

The Autonomy of the Image

Remarks on Thomas Kellner’s work


Those of you who viewed Thomas Kellner’s images the first time may have first rubbed their eyes and then asked themselves, “What am I actually seeing? Can I trust my own eyes? Am I standing in front of a trompe l’oeil, one of those optical illusions, which have become more and more popular since the 1600s? Is it a technical-lab or computer-supported simulation of an earthquake? Was a model shaken or even jumbled? What sense does this seemingly disordered arsenal of shapes make? And that is supposed to be photography worth its money?” The answer in short: Yes! And how!

Once the affective perceptive phase is over, be it either spontaneous or adverse, usually intensive cognitive perceptions of diverse intensity follow, demanding the who, what and why; that is to say: the facts, objects and processes. Especially Kellner’s images awaken an inquisitiveness, carried out by a personal knowledge of the places, memories of the buildings or only of the significant symbols; similar to how the Quadriga on the Brandenburg Gate has become almost an icon. In some cases, the monument is identified immediately, in others it can be deciphered based on the repertoire of shapes, whereby in a few, not omnipresent objects, the fast “wow” experience remains hidden. In any case, an intellectual-visual confrontation takes place with Kellner’s relevant image; the viewer’s participation in internalizing the piece of artwork thus quite quickly reaches a climax.

Once we have set the conceivable prima vista impression aside and begun to view the images exactly, then we start to register the continuous system, a technique of putting together and setting up a picture. The black, horizontal strips with codes and continuous numbers as well as the thin vertical, seemingly continuous divisions make clear that we are dealing with film material and contact sheets. The amount of individual shots, the length of the film strips and the height of the arrangement depend on the relevant subject and its mutation. There are neither standard formats nor standard sizes since each subject and every image idea poses its own requirements, thereby resulting in 35 to 1,296 individual shots per image, depending on the format, size and picture density.

What belongs here to Thomas Kellner’s  unique technique and composition style at the same time reminds us of the picture flood that we are all subjected to around the clock, practically without any breaks. Almost 98% of them are created with a photographic camera along with all of the technology that follows - up to the quick and clumsy cell phone image. We, that is to say every generation is surrounded by a colorful picture world that leads us to perceive many things in passing, ostensibly and superficially, thereby leading us to often see everything and yet nothing. The catchy picture which therefore does not require any analysis and thought is often the most popular.

Kellner’s artistic approach stands in direct contrast to the indiscriminate picture masses. Each individual image has been searched for and found, plays an important role within the whole presentation; it needs to be looked at and be understood within its context.

A further aspect to take into consideration is that Kellner’s images are an important visual and perceptional aid. Everything we see and is accepted by reality in general are details, which are nothing else than parts of the whole. Be it a panorama, a building or a detail, the pars pro toto character remains, which we usually do not notice any more. Our world, the way we understand and realize it thus exists for us in more or less smaller segments which in the end arrange themselves into our personal view of the world.

Thomas Kellner’s works are a perfect example of this type of reality experience. His extraordinary and notable architectures, which are real eye-catchers, exist solely because of the artistic-technical-esthetic relationship of detail and image concept. Imagining an effective image thereby stands at the beginning of the total creative image process – it is the necessary creative impulse. The overview of individual works and sequences of the artist demonstrates to us that every place and every structure, every exterior and interior in the image requires its own language of shapes and arrangement. The results contain nothing of a reproduction thanks to the artistic autonomy of a vision; everything is composition using only the object and the camera.

Without a doubt, Thomas Kellner’s photographic artwork contains an absolutely high level of recognition since no one else works like this. In large cycles he dedicates himself to almost only architecture and monuments as in, for example, “Dancing Walls” or “Tango Metropolis”. Landscapes usually only play a role in connection with bridges and people appear as a rule only as extras, passers-by and visitors.

The main topic is the historical and contemporary world built by man. It mirrors the real as well as associated subjects – history, time, spirituality, culture, power, spirit and pride. At this point, we do not need to deal with the meaning of architecture for man further; for him it is fundamental.

The debate between photography and architecture, which after reaching its prime in the 20s and 50s of the last century, suffered from a “disturbed relationship” (according to the title of a conference in Hagen in 1997) and has since the 1980s experienced a strong revival, especially through the Düsseldorf School and through the new and fresh impulses of Kellner’s artwork. The fact that in the fall of 2004, the photo-fair cologne in line with the Photokina World of Imaging used only one of Kellner’s images on its posters is a distinct global indication of the quality and magical strength of his images.

Within ourselves we carry a preconceived, virtually fixed understanding of images that usually does not withstand a seriously experienced, direct encounter. On the one hand, this has to do with the fact that every picture – regardless of the type – is a construct. On the other hand, each real object triggers a different experience and reaction within its current space, influenced by external circumstances, such as light or weather.

As with every picture, for example the popular, nearly iconic postcard images distributed worldwide, it will never be possible to drive out the general opinion that objective reality can be held fast by the click of a camera. This can be proven briefly and precisely using the image of the Brandenburg Gate. Even though the images more or less were the same, the reality of the Gate during the Third Reich, the conquest and liberation of Berlin, the GDR era, the fall of the Berlin Wall, Reunification or during a general sight-seeing trip now has always been totally different.

In looking at Thomas Kellner’s relevant images, the difference in his creative approach to others is instantly recognized. He has brought the pathos formula “Brandenburg Gate” to life, which through folds and layers, static and movement, contraction and extension, balance and its endangerment conveys something from the permanent process of history and the present almost in a flash. As such the image that is remembered is not cemented in, but also holds a space open for the future. All of his works contain something organic, vital, continuous that besides its external effect also marks the internal strength as its actual continual rising and falling source.

Dance movements have often been brought in connection with Kellner’s photographic work. However, they do not serve an end to themselves, no stylized empty images and most certainly not any picture stunts. It is much more an expression of an inherent procedural dynamic, which in the resulting image seems to win as a type of intermediate state in the sense of a “still”. The individual development of the image and its autonomous visual language underline the awareness that besides reality and the image, the third force of the photographic reality does exist, won creatively and not reproductively.

In considering Kellner’s artwork carefully, an almost minute understanding of the relevant creative process becomes possible. Starting at the picture basis, shot mostly from the front, the various camera positions or rather angles of the object can be read precisely in their horizontal image sequence as well as in their vertical relationships. Small sections of the object assist in comprehending the consistent composition as well as total tectonics of the image. This original process continually grows from the bottom upwards and needs to reach a level of perfect coherence in its sequence as well as in the vertical relationships of the picture strips to one another through planning and calculation. The results are not related to disassociation; they do, however, encourage opening up many new possible interpretations in this direction.

The four corners of visual art, namely description and invention, distortion and interpretation, have been discussed in theory and experimented with in practice for centuries. Thomas Kellner’s photographic art continues with this tradition. It changes the photographic object in the sense of a formal method, its investigative impact and most of all, a new explanatory option.

The images, which remind us of multivision wall, stride from the well-known subject step-by-step and layer-by-layer to a break-up of the object, which could be described as de-construction. Otherwise, the motor function won in the image also employs formal and programmatic tendencies of futurism, which in its approach intended to correspond to the multi-sensoric and simultaneous human processes of visual perception. There are unconscious or even deliberate historical connections between Kellner’s work and the vibrant paintings of the French Orphist Robert Delaunay, whose “Eifel Tower” (1910, Kunstmuseum Basel) is virtually animated by the light and mirror of a similar viewpoint.

In keeping with a constantly changing semblance of figures and in perceiving a distinct accent of the analytical or synthetic cubism, Kellner’s structures in the end attain dematerialization and ethereality. Typical examples are the staggering Cathedral of Lisbon, which reminds us of the terrible earthquake of 1755; the National Museum of Anthropology in Mexico City, which signals the vitality of historical objects; the Capitol in Washington is reminiscent of the endangered world power of the Babylonian Tower; the protest of the fragile 9/11 Twin Towers; and the cracked, nested into one another design of the Museum Ludwig behind the Cathedral in Cologne nowadays appears to be almost an early premonition of the immeasurable loss of culture through the unbelievable collapse of that city’s archives.

Construction and deconstruction, composition and fragmentation often lie next to each other in the images. Through compression that wonderful “Stonehenge” (2002) image renders the archaic monumental stone henge to something similar to a protective bird’s nest. This was six years before archeology discovered that this area had once served as a place to recover and gain spiritual strength and not only to serve those in search of healing through medicine. All of these formal, compositional, reminiscent and visionary aspects explain Thomas Kellner’s oevre up to now as an exciting and important contribution to contemporary photography.

In conclusion: Thomas Kellner’s work and methodology are exceptional. They rightfully claim their unique characteristics in the worldwide photography scene. In connection with the history, the techniques and the requirements of photography and photographic art, they are self-reflexive. They stand in the tradition of the field, yet are innovative in an unusual courageous way. Their roots are original queries to the contents and visual value as well as a rational and emotional, fierce creativity.

Questioning evolved iconographs and usual image expectations offer Kellner new approaches in composition and meaning from object to object, from image solution to image solution. His art deals with reality, employing both the level of interpretation behind it along with abstraction at the same time. Even though they are formally and intellectually very challenging, the images are understandable and thus accessible for everyone. It is a type of art that reaches people by catching their eye. This photographic art which lets many expectations arise for the future, satisfies not only quick picture consumerism but also awakens intensive searches in one’s self, opens up questions and the participation of the viewer.

Thomas Kellner’s work up to date takes its brilliant place at the high level along with the previous three winners of the “District of Düren’s Art Award”. Congratulations to the District of Düren and the award-winner for the distinguished, excellent international position taken in.
Professor Frank Günter Zehnder, PhD

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Von der Autonomie des Bildes

Anmerkungen zum Werk von Thomas Kellner


Wer die Bilder von Thomas Kellner zum ersten Male sieht, reibt sich möglicherweise zunächst einmal die Augen und fragt sich „Was sehe ich da eigentlich? Kann ich meinen Augen trauen? Stehe ich vor einem Trompe l’oeil, einer jener seit dem 16. Jahrhundert zunehmend beliebten Augentäuschungen? Ist das die labortechnische oder computergestützte Simulation eines Erdbebens? Wurde ein Modell erschüttert oder gar durcheinander gewürfelt?
Welchen Sinn macht dieses scheinbar ungeordnete Formenarsenal? Und das soll preiswürdige Fotografie sein?“ Kurze Antwort: Diese Fotokunst ist es, - und wie!

Auf die affektive Wahrnehmung – sei sie spontan zustimmend oder ablehnend – folgt in der Regel die unterschiedlich intensive kognitive Wahrnehmung, die nach dem Was und Wie, also nach den Fakten, Sachen und Prozessen fragt. Gerade bei Kellners Bildern wird eine recherchierende Neugier geweckt, die von der persönlichen Kenntnis der Orte, von der Erinnerung an die Gebäude oder auch nur von signifikanten Symbolen – wie etwa der schon fast zur Ikone gewordenen Quadriga des Brandenburger Tores - getragen wird. In manchen Fällen ergibt sich eine sofortige Identifizierung des Monumentes, in anderen kann man es aufgrund des Formenrepertoires entschlüsseln, und in einigen nicht omnipräsenten Objekten bleibt der schnelle Aha-Effekt verschlossen. In jedem Falle setzt aber eine intellektuell-visuelle Auseinandersetzung mit dem jeweiligen Bild Kellners ein, die Beteiligung des Betrachters an der inneren Aufnahme des Kunstwerkes erreicht sozusagen schon ganz früh einen Höhepunkt.
     
Wenn wir den denkbaren prima vista - Eindruck einmal beiseite lassen und uns einer genauen Betrachtung der Bilder zuwenden, registriert man darin ein System, eine durchgehende Methode der Bilderansammlung und des Bildaufbaus. Schwarze, horizontal laufende, mit Codes und fortlaufenden Nummern versehene Streifen sowie dünnere, vertikal angelegte, scheinbar durchgehende Teilungen machen klar, dass wir es hier mit Filmmaterial und Kontaktabzügen zu tun haben. Die Anzahl der Einzelbilder, die Länge der Filmstreifen und die Höhe der Schichtung ergeben sich aus dem jeweiligen Motiv und seiner Mutation. Es gibt keine Standardformate oder Normgrößen, denn jedes Sujet und jede Bildidee stellen ihre jeweils eigenen Bedingungen. So reicht die Anzahl der Einzelaufnahmen von 35 bis 1296, je nach Format, Größe und Dichte des Bildes.

Was hier zur unverwechselbaren Technik und Kompositionsweise von Thomas Kellner gehört, erinnert doch zugleich auch an die Bilderschwemme, der wir alle rund um die Uhr geradezu pausenlos ausgesetzt sind. Zu fast 98 % hat sie mit der fotografischen Kamera und ihrer gesamten Nachfolgetechnik bis hin zum schnellen und ungelenken Handy-Foto zu tun. Wir, das heißt: alle Generationen sind von einer bunten Bilderwelt umgeben, die dazu führt, vieles nur flüchtig, vordergründig und oberflächlich wahrzunehmen. So sehen wir oft alles und nichts. Das eingängige Bild, das keiner Analyse und Hinterfragung bedarf, ist deshalb oft das liebste. Zu diesem unterschiedslosen Bilderkonsum steht das künstlerische Vorgehen Kellners - trotz seines erheblichen Bildereinsatzes - in einem deutlichen Gegensatz. Jedes Einzelbild ist gesucht und gefunden, spielt eine wichtige Rolle im Gesamt einer Darstellung, es muss betrachtet und will im Kontext verstanden werden.
In einem weiteren Aspekt leisten seine Bilder eine wichtige Seh- und Erkenntnishilfe. Alles, was wir sehen und grundsätzlich von der Wirklichkeit aufnehmen, sind Ausschnitte, sind nichts anderes als Teile des Ganzen. Ob es ein Panorama, ein Gebäude oder ein Detail ist, der pars pro toto-Charakter bleibt, nur realisieren wir das meist nicht mehr. So bestehen unsere Welt, ihre Erkenntnis und ihr Erlebnis für uns nur aus mehr oder weniger kleinen Segmenten, die sich am Ende zu einem persönlichen Weltbild fügen. Geradezu exemplarisch spiegelt sich diese Art der Wirklichkeitserfahrung in den Werken von Thomas Kellner. Seine merk- und denkwürdigen Architekturen, die ja echte Hingucker sind, verdanken ihre einzigartige Bildexistenz ausschließlich dem künstlerisch-technisch-ästhetischen Verhältnis von Detail und Bildidee. Dabei steht die Vorstellung eines wirksamen Bildes am Anfang des gesamten Aufnahme- und Gestaltungsprozesses, sie ist zwingend der schöpferische Impuls. Die Übersicht über die Einzelwerke und Sequenzen des Künstlers belehrt uns, dass jeder Ort und jedes Bauwerk, jedes Äußere und Innere im Bild eine nur ihm eigene Formensprache und Anordnung bedingt. Dabei ist im Ergebnis nichts Abbildung, sondern alles Komposition, nichts nur dem Objekt und dem Apparat, sondern vor allem einer Vision und der künstlerischen Autonomie verdankt.    

Ohne Zweifel haben die fotokünstlerischen Werke Thomas Kellners einen absoluten Wiedererkennungswert, arbeitet doch niemand sonst auf diese Weise. Er widmet sich in großen Zyklen wie beispielsweise „Dancing Walls“ oder „Tango Metropolis“ fast ausschließlich der Architektur und Monumenten. Landschaft spielt meist nur im Zusammenhang mit Brücken etwa eine Rolle, und Menschen erscheinen in der Regel lediglich als Statisten, Passanten und Besucher. Das Hauptthema ist die von Menschen erbaute historische und zeitgenössische Welt, sie spiegelt sowohl real als auch assoziativ unter anderem Geschichte, Zeit, Spiritualität, Kultur, Macht, Geist und Stolz. Über die Bedeutung von Architektur für den Menschen brauchen wir hier nicht weiter handeln, sie ist für ihn existenziell. Die Auseinandersetzung zwischen Fotografie und Architektur, für die nach einer Blütezeit in den zwanziger und fünfziger Jahren des letzten Jahrhunderts ein „gestörtes Verhältnis“ (so der Titel einer Hagener Tagung 1997) konstatiert wurde, erfuhr seit den achtziger Jahren vor allem durch die Düsseldorfer Schule eine kräftige Wiederbelebung und gewinnt auch durch die Arbeiten Kellners neue und erfrischende Impulse. Dass die Internationale Messe für Fotografie Köln, die „photo fair-cologne“ im Herbst 2004 auf ihrem Plakat nur mit einem Bild Kellners warb, ist ein deutlicher globaler Hinweis auf die Qualität und die Bannkraft seiner Bilder.

Von Orten und Monumenten, die jeder aus Publikationen oder aus eigener Erinnerung kennt, haben wir ein vorgefasstes, geradezu festgelegtes  Bildverständnis, das meist einer ernsthaft erlebten direkten Begegnung nicht standhält. Das hat einerseits damit zu tun, dass jedes Bild – gleich welcher Gattung - ein Konstrukt ist, und andererseits damit, dass jedes reale Objekt in seinem räumlichen, aktuellen und von äußeren Umständen wie Beleuchtung oder Witterung abhängigen Kontext einen anderen Erlebnisreflex auslöst. Wie jedes Foto, so bieten auch die berühmten, weltweit verbreiteten, fast ikonenhaften Postkartenmotive nie die Wirklichkeit, auch wenn sich die gängige Meinung, mit dem Klick des Apparates halte man die objektive Realität fest, nicht austreiben lässt. Am Motiv des Brandenburger Tors lässt sich das beispielhaft ganz knapp und präzise belegen: Auch wenn die Abbildungen in etwa gleich blieben, war seine Wirklichkeit im Dritten Reich, bei der Eroberung und Befreiung Berlins, in der DDR-Zeit, beim Mauerfall, bei der Wiedervereinigung oder jetzt beim allgemeinen Sightseeing stets eine völlig andere. Bei der Betrachtung der entsprechenden Bilder von Thomas Kellner erkennt man schlagartig seinen anderen deutenden wie kreativen Ansatz. Die Pathosformel „Brandenburger Tor“ hat er hinüberverwandelt in eine Lebendigkeit, die durch Knicke und Schichtung, durch Statuarik und Bewegung, durch Lagerung und Streckung, durch Gleichgewicht und dessen Gefährdung etwas vom permanenten Prozess aus Geschichte und Gegenwart geradezu blitzartig  vermittelt. Damit prägt ein solches Bild im Gedächtnis keinen zementierten Zustand, sondern hält auch Zukunft bereit. Alle seine Werke erhalten so etwas Organisches, Lebendiges, Fortwirkendes, das neben der äußeren Wirkung auch die innere Kraft als deren eigentliche fortwährend an- und abschwellende Quelle markiert.

Eine tanzende Bewegung ist schon oft mit den Fotoarbeiten Kellners in Zusammenhang gebracht worden, doch ist sie kein Selbstzweck, keine manierierte Bildfloskel und erst recht kein Bildgag. Sie ist vielmehr Ausdruck einer innewohnenden prozessualen Dynamik, die im Bildergebnis eine Art Zwischenzustand im Sinne eines „stills“ zu gewinnen scheint. Die individuelle Bildentstehung und die autonome Bildsprache unterstreichen das Bewusstsein, dass es neben der Wirklichkeit und dem Bild als dritte Kraft auch die Fotowirklichkeit gibt, die nicht reproduktiv sondern kreativ gewonnen wird. Bei der analytischen Betrachtung von Kellners Kunstwerken kann man den jeweiligen Gestaltungsprozess beinahe minutiös nachvollziehen. Von der meist noch frontal geschossenen Bildbasis ausgehend lassen sich die unterschiedlichen Kamerastellungen bzw. Motivneigungen in der waagerechten Bildfolge wie in den vertikalen Bezügen präzise nachlesen. Dabei helfen stets kleine Motivanschnitte, den konsequenten Bildaufbau und die gesamte Bildtektonik zu verstehen. Dieser originelle Prozess wächst stets von unten nach oben und muss durch  Planung und Berechnung eine perfekte Stimmigkeit in der Reihenfolge wie in den vertikalen Bezügen der Bildstreifen zueinander garantieren. Die Ergebnisse gehorchen nicht der Verfremdung, sondern der Deutung, indem sie mannigfaltige neue Möglichkeiten in dieser Richtung eröffnen.

Die Quadratur der Bildkunst, nämlich Beschreibung und Erfindung, Verformung und Interpretation, wird seit Jahrhunderten theoretisch diskutiert und praktisch experimentiert. Thomas Kellners Fotokunst steht in dieser fortwirkenden Tradition. Sie verändert den Bildgegenstand im Sinne einer formalen Methode, einer Wirkungsrecherche und vor allem einer neuen Deutungsoption. Die an Multivisionswände erinnernden Werke schreiten vom bekannten Sujet Schnitt um Schnitt und Schicht um Schicht zu einer Auflösung des Gegenstandes, die man auch als Dekonstruktion bezeichnen könnte. Andererseits verwendet die gewonnene Motorik im Bild auch formale und programmatische Absichten des Futurismus, der mit seinen Ansätzen den  multisensorischen und simultanen menschlichen Wahrnehmungsvorgängen entsprechen wollte. Unbewusste oder auch bewusste historische Bezüge ergeben sich vom Werk Kellners auch zu den vibrierenden Gemälden des französischen Orphisten Robert Delaunay, dessen im Licht und Spiegel geradezu beseelter „Eiffelturm“ (1910) im Kunstmuseum Basel eine ähnliche Bildabsicht äußert. Unter Beibehaltung einer wie auch immer veränderten Figürlichkeit und unter Wahrnehmung eines deutlichen Akzentes des analytischen oder synthetischen Kubismus gelangen Kellners Bildaufbauten letzten Endes zur Entmaterialisierung und Vergeistigung. So wie zum Beispiel seine wankende Kathedrale von Lissabon das furchtbare Erdbeben von 1755 in Erinnerung ruft, so wie das Anthropologische Museum von Mexico City die Lebendigkeit der geschichtlichen Dinge signalisiert, so lässt das Capitol in Washington an den gefährdeten babylonischen Turmbau einer Weltmacht denken, so reklamieren fragile Türme den 11. September in New York, und das geborstene, ineinander geschachtelte Museum Ludwig hinter dem Dom wirkt uns heute beinahe wie eine frühe Vorahnung des maßlosen Kulturverlustes durch den unglaublichen Archiveinsturz in Köln. Konstruktion und Dekonstruktion, Aufbau und Fragmentierung liegen in den Bildern oft nahe beieinander. Das wunderbare Bild „Stonehenge“ (2002) macht aus dem archaisch monumentalen Stelenkreis durch Verdichtung so etwas wie ein bergendes Vogelnest, - und das sechs Jahre vor der neuen archäologischen Erkenntnis, dass der Ort Heilsuchenden über die medizinische Hilfe hinaus zur Gesundung und spirituellen Stärkung diente. Alle diese formalen, kompositorischen, erinnernden und visionären Aspekte erklären das bisherige Oeuvre Thomas Kellners als einen spannenden und wichtigen Beitrag zur zeitgenössischen Fotografie.

Zusammengefasst kann gesagt werden: Werke und Arbeitsweise von Thomas Kellner sind außergewöhnlich, sie beanspruchen mit Recht in der weltweiten Fotoszene ein Alleinstellungsmerkmal, sie sind – bezogen auf die Geschichte, die Techniken und den Anspruch der Gattung Fotografie/Fotokunst – selbstreflexiv. Sie stehen in der Tradition des Faches, sind aber auf ungewöhnlich mutige Weise innovativ, ihre Wurzeln sind originäre Fragestellungen zu Inhalt und Bildwert sowie eine rational wie emotional ungestüme Kreativität. Das Infragestellen gewachsener Ikonografien und gewohnter Bilderwartungen bietet ihm von Objekt zu Objekt, von Bildlösung zu Bildlösung neue Ansätze der Komposition und Deutung. Seine Werke arbeiten mit der Wirklichkeit, mit der dahinter liegenden Interpretationsebene und zugleich mit der Abstraktion. Obwohl sie formal und intellektuell sehr anspruchsvoll sind, bleiben sie für jedermann lesbar und damit zugänglich. Es ist eine Kunst, die den Menschen erreicht, indem sie den Blick fesselt. Diese Fotokunst, die für die Zukunft vieles erwarten lässt, befriedigt nicht einen schnellen Bildkonsum, sondern weckt intensiv eigene Recherchen, weckt die Fragen und die Beteiligung der Betrachter.

Das bisherige Werk von Thomas Kellner reiht sich glänzend dem hohen Niveau der drei vorhergehenden Preisträger des „Kunstpreises des Kreises Düren“ an. Dem Preisträger und dem Kreis Düren ist herzlich zu dieser Auszeichnung einer exzellenten internationalen Position zu gratulieren.

Prof. Dr. Frank Günter Zehnder